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Avez-vous un intérêt pour les registres numériques de vaccination (RNV)?

La Fondation Apprendre Genève a le plaisir d’annoncer le lancement par l’Organisation pan-américaine de la Santé (OPS) de son programme Scholar, avec un cours inaugural en espagnol sur le thème des registres numériques de vaccination (RNV).

Si vous souhaitez suivre ce cours en anglais ou en français, nous vous invitons à déclarer votre intérêt. Accédez au formulaire…

Veuillez partager cette invitation avec vos collègues et réseaux de confiance.

Lorsque vous enregistrez votre déclaration d’intérêt, le lien pour télécharger la publication “Registre numériques de vaccination: considérations pratiques pour la planification, le développement, la mise en œuvre et l’évaluation, 2018” (en anglais) s’affiche à l’écran.

Si vous parlez espagnol ou travaillez avec des hispanophones, vous trouverez l’annonce complète du cours et le dossier de candidature via ce lien

Are you interested in Electronic Immunization Registries (EIR)?

The Geneva Learning Foundation is pleased to announce that the Pan-American Health Organization (PAHO) has just launched its Scholar programme with an inaugural course in Spanish on the topic of electronic immunization registries (EIR).

If you would be interested in taking this course in English or in French, please complete this form to express your interest.

Upon registering your interest, the link to download the publication Electronic Immunization Registry: Practical Considerations for Planning, Development, Implementation and Evaluation, 2018 will be displayed on your screen.

If you are a Spanish speaker or work with Spanish speakers, you will find the full course announcement via this linkPlease share this call for expressions of interest with your trusted colleagues and networks.

Obed Nuobe: Project acceleration leads to more pregnant women vaccinated in Suaman District, Ghana

GENEVA, 2 August 2019 (The Geneva Learning Foundation) – Obed Nuobe has been a Health Information Officer in the Suaman District, Ghana, since 2015. In July 2019, he completed the “Reducing Inequities and Improving Coverage” Scholar course.

He is one of more than 600 Alumni of the WHO Scholar programme from 53 countries who joined the Impact Accelerator last month, signing a Pledge to “work with others to transform projects led by Scholars into action and results that will improve immunization outcomes.”

Obed Nuobe

“When I analysed the data in our District, I saw that only 51.7% of pregnant women received the Td2 + vaccines in 2018. Our target was 80% – and we were a long way from meeting it.”

“Our expected pregnancy rate shows that we should be vaccinating about 93 women per month to meet the annual target. We averaged 47. Yet 95% of pregnant women who visit our health facilities are checked for HB and tested for HIV. So there was a gap in the system somewhere.”

“The District Health Director and Management team were enthusiastic to change this. We met with midwives and community health nurses in April 2019.”

“The new maternal health booklet includes space for Td 1-Td 5 , so it is easy to see whether someone has been vaccinated when they go for an ante-natal check-up (ANC)”

“But the midwives thought that they were not allowed to give vaccinations. We also found out that ANC days were conducted without Td vaccines and most women went away without seeing Community Health Nurses due to long waiting times, or the Nurse not vaccinating that day.”

“We confirmed that midwives can give the Td vaccines. We supported the facilities to make a list of defaulters, and made it available so that when women go for ANC or check-up, midwives could easily see who was missing the vaccination, and get them vaccinated.”

“I also had to visit two facilities whose midwives had not been at our meeting in April to share this information with them.”

“In May 2019 we vaccinated 104 pregnant women, and in June 82: a lot better than the 47 we were achieving before. I have developed a weekly reporting form, so that we can track data as we go, rather than waiting for the end of the month.”

“Very few districts in Ghana meet the target of 80% of pregnant women reached with the Td2 + vaccines. If we can show the impact of what we have done, we hope our approach will be adopted by other Regions, and then nationally.”

“For me, it was important to engage with the District health management team for them to give remedial input into my plans. We do not have resources for now, but we can go around the system to continue to improve it!”

What difference did the Impact Accelerator make?

“I had started implementing my project before the Accelerator [launch pad, a four-week exercise] began,” explains Obed. So what difference did it make to work with Scholars from Ghana and other countries, all of them working to implement projects that began as course work? “It was very positive that the Accelerator kept tracking progress of my project and asking for the next steps.”

“The Ghana Scholars country group [formed by the country’s Alumni during the Impact Accelerator] meets every Sunday evening. We are expected to tell other group members what we have done in the previous week. We also give input to other Scholars facing challenges in implementing their projects.”

“The best thing about the Accelerator exercise was the focus on action on the ground, rather than theory and planning.”

This article was first posted on the Impact Accelerator, a new platform open to Scholar Alumni who have pledged to work together to achieve impact.

About the WHO Scholar programme

The Geneva Learning Foundation’s Scholar Approach is a state-of-the-art evidence-based package for capability development required to lead complex change. This unique Approach has already been shown to not only enhance competencies but also to foster collaborative implementation of transformative projects that begin as course work and end with impact.

  • WHO has used the Scholar Approach since 2016 to support country-level action planning and capability development to improve immunization outcomes:
  • The WHO Scholar programme’s network is growing rapidly, with 4,467 English speakers and 2,968 Francophones from 90 countries having participated in the programme’s activities.
  • Working together, Scholars have used WHO guidelines to develop more than 2,000 peer-reviewed, context-specific projects, with over 90% reporting that they routinely use what they learned from the programme.
  • Over 400 programme participants have served as Accompanists, supporting their peers and exercising leadership in new ways that challenge failed, conventional training-of-trainer and cascade models.
  • In some countries, Scholars have spontaneously initiated informal, self-led and motivated groupings of professionals operating across agencies that may provide a different kind of lever for systemic change than traditional top-down approaches to addressing immunization challenges.
  • Building on these emergent dynamics, Scholars are now being invited to join the first Impact Accelerator, working with colleagues from their country toward collaborative project implementation.
  • The programme is fully digital, with no upper limit to the number of participants, and has mobilized participants without having to offer per diem, travel, or hotel accommodation.

The WHO Scholar programme is being developed by the Geneva Learning Foundation and its partners for the World Health organization, with support from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation (BMGF).

Accélérateur d’impact: un événement exceptionnel pour faire le point sur les enquêtes de couverture vaccinale (ECV) post-campagne

GENÈVE, le 15 juillet 2019 – 858 personnes étaient inscrites pour participer à cet événement sous l’égide de l’Accélérateur d’impact le 15 juillet 2019.

Avec la participation de Carolina Danovaro (OMS), Mamadou Diallo (UNICEF), David Koffi (ADS), et Carol Tevi-Benissan (OMS).

Voici l’enregistrement de l’événement.

Une ASV est toute activité vaccinale conduite en plus des services de vaccination systématique.

 Les enquêtes de couverture vaccinale post-campagne:

Consulter la page de l’OMS à propos de la couverture vaccinale

Qu’est-ce que l’Accélérateur d’impact?

  • Un système pour faire mieux, plus vite, et ensemble. 
  • Une composante de l’Approche Scholar développée par la Fondation Apprendre Genève.

Over 600 professionals from 53 countries connect to lead change towards global immunization goals

I would like to join hands with other Scholars to create a data improvement plan that will improve the quality of data in Lagos and in Nigeria as a whole.

Simisola Abedeji, Data Assistant, WHO, Nigeria

Over 600 professionals from 53 countries connect to lead transformative change towards the global immunization goals.

GENEVA, 1 JULY 2019 – The Geneva Learning Foundation (TGLF) today launched the first-ever exercise of its new Impact Accelerator.  Open to all Alumni working on immunization,  over 600 alumni from 53 countries have pledged to create a new dynamic, transforming projects developed during courses they have taken together into measurable progress towards the global goals for immunization.

“The Impact Accelerator offers a flexible approach to support professionals on the ground working for impact better and faster, together” explains Reda Sadki (@redasadki), president of the Geneva Learning Foundation. “We noticed Scholar Alumni were, without any support from us, implementing Scholar projects in the field and spontaneously coming together in informal groups.  When we performed the first impact evaluation, we found real, measurable impact from such initiatives. We realised that there was an opportunity to accelerate such change.”

Over a third  of the Scholars who have signed up to the Impact Accelerator programme work at the district level. Two thirds have displayed exceptional talent and leadership in Scholar courses, serving as volunteer tutors and coaches known as “Accompanists”.

These are the professionals who together have the potential to transform global guidelines into action in the field.

The structure and activities of the Impact Accelerator were finalised through five consultative meetings with Alumni. “It was indispensable”, says Sadki, “to recognise the value of Scholars’ experience and expertise of their own contexts. They know where the children are.”

“I would like to participate in the Impact Accelerator as a country team leader. I will first and foremost want to put in place a solid Scholar group for my country that is recognized, validated and supported by the country’s immunization leadership.”

Charlotte Njua Mbuh, Data Manager and Surveillance Officer, South Regional Delegation of Public Health, Cameroon

Alongside this inaugural exercise, the Foundation has also partnered with Dr David Koffi, who is leading a GAVI-supported project to accelerate the development of a new generation of vaccination coverage survey leaders. This project to improve the quality of surveys will provide field-based training to a small group drawn from the WHO Survey Scholar programme, an 18-week course to teach the WHO Coverage Cluster Surveys Reference Manual.

About the Foundation’s Scholar Approach

The Geneva Learning Foundation’s Scholar Approach is a state-of-the-art evidence-based package for capability development required to lead complex change. This unique Approach has already been shown to not only enhance competencies but also to foster collaborative implementation of transformative projects that begin as course work and end with impact.

The Scholar Approach is being developed with support from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation (BMGF).

WHO Scholar programme webinar series #4: Reducing missed opportunities for vaccination (MOV)

This blog post is part of a series about the WHO Scholar programme’s webinar series in May and June 2019 about reducing inequities and improving coverage for immunization. Learn more and register for the webinars

Over 2,200 immunization professionals from 96 countries registered to participate in the World Health Organization Scholar programme’s first open webinar series on reducing inequities and improving coverage for immunization. The third webinar led by WHO’s Samir Sodha focused on immunization in the second year of life (2YL).

Watch the recording of this WHO Scholar programme webinar

WHO Scholar programme webinar series #3: Reducing inequities in urban immunization

This blog post is part of a series about the WHO Scholar programme’s webinar series in May and June 2019 about reducing inequities and improving coverage for immunization. Learn more and register for the webinars

Over 2,200 immunization professionals from 96 countries registered to participate in the World Health Organization Scholar programme’s first open webinar series on reducing inequities and improving coverage for immunization. This webinar led by UNICEF’s Godwin Mindra focused on how to address inequitable immunization coverage in the urban context.

Watch the recording of this WHO Scholar programme webinar

Leading change from the ground up: 300 Scholars from 51 countries take up the challenge of reducing inequities and improving coverage for immunization

GENEVA, 24 May 2019 (The Geneva Learning Foundation) – The sixteenth cohort from the WHO Scholar programme since 2016, kicking off Monday, aims to transform not one but four guidelines from WHO and UNICEF into action to reduce inequities and improve coverage.

300 immunization professionals from 51 countries were selected by WHO from over 1,500 applicants for this Level 2 Scholar certification. Alongside the course, the programme is also offering a webinar series for which over 2,200 participants have registered.

In six weeks, each Scholar will develop a context-specific action plan, drawing on the guidelines, to the extent that they are relevant and useful, but also on the experience and expertise of their peers.

One third of these new Scholars have direct responsibility for national immunization planning and another third contribute to it, with equal proportions of participants from central and district levels.

The participation of district-level immunization leaders is especially important, as this is “ground zero” where vaccination efforts ultimately succeed or fail. One in four are working at the district level.

UNICEF’s Godwin Mindra, author of the urban inequity tool kit said: “The work that we do at HQ would make no sense if at the country level it’s not translated into practical interventions. That’s why we come back to you at the country level, at the district level”

In the past, immunization training approaches have resorted to broken “cascade” or “training of trainer” models that have failed to produce the change needed to “move the needle” of immunization outcomes.

In the WHO Scholar programme, every course participant has direct access to the best available global experts, in addition to the knowledge contained in the guidelines.

Furthermore, 100 Scholars in the new cohort have more than ten years of immunization experience, providing deep experience and practical knowledge that complements the global guidelines. 

Over half of each cohort volunteers to serve as Accompanists, who form a tightly-knit community of peer tutors, coaches, and mentors to welcome and guide new Scholars.

This course will be offered in French later this year, as the WHO Scholar programme is multi-lingual.

About the WHO Scholar programme

The Geneva Learning Foundation’s Scholar Approach is a state-of-the-art evidence-based package for capability development required to lead complex change. This unique Approach has already been shown to not only enhance competencies but also to foster collaborative implementation of transformative projects that begin as course work and end with impact.

  • WHO has used the Scholar Approach since 2016 to support country-level action planning and capability development to improve immunization outcomes:
  • The WHO Scholar programme’s network is growing rapidly, with 4,467 English speakers and 2,968 Francophones from 90 countries having participated in the programme’s activities.
  • Working together, Scholars have used WHO guidelines to develop more than 2,000 peer-reviewed, context-specific projects, with over 90% reporting that they routinely use what they learned from the programme.
  • Over 400 programme participants have served as Accompanists, supporting their peers and exercising leadership in new ways that challenge failed, conventional training-of-trainer and cascade models.
  • In some countries, Scholars have spontaneously initiated informal, self-led and motivated groupings of professionals operating across agencies that may provide a different kind of lever for systemic change than traditional top-down approaches to addressing immunization challenges.
  • Building on these emergent dynamics, Scholars are now being invited to join the first Impact Accelerator, working with colleagues from their country toward collaborative project implementation.
  • The programme is fully digital, with no upper limit to the number of participants, and has mobilized participants without having to offer per diem, travel, or hotel accommodation.

The WHO Scholar programme is being developed by the Geneva Learning Foundation and its partners for the World Health organization, with support from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation (BMGF).

Making bright spots happen: WHO immunization Scholars from 90 countries commit to achieving impact

GENEVA, 15 May 2019 (The Geneva Learning Foundation) – “Bright spots” in routine immunization are stories about immunization programmes that have successfully improved performance at a subnational level in LMICs and LICs.

We can wait for them to happen. We can try to find them.

Or we can support those who make them happen.

On 15 May 2019, 189 Scholar Alumni from the latest cohort of the World Health Organization’s course on routine immunization planning united to commit to achieving impact towards the global goals for immunization.

Every Scholar has already developed a practical plan to improve routine immunization in their context, and has helped their colleagues improve their plans.

Now they are taking action to move from ideas to implementation.

Over one-third of Scholar Alumni work at the district level, where children live and where immunization outcomes actually happen.

They are part of a larger group of over 1,000 Alumni of the WHO Scholar programme. The first impact evaluation of the programme found a surprising number of Alumni who documented improved immunization coverage as a result of implementing projects that began as course work.

By actively supporting each other, Scholars hope to multiply such individual success stories into a collective effort where course work is transformed into implementation on the road to impact.

On 22 May, Scholars will reconvene, this time to hear first-hand such success stories from 60 WHO Scholar programme Alumni.

Over 400 Alumni are already actively supporting colleagues as Accompanists, peer tutors and coaches who demonstrate exceptional leadership and genuine care for colleagues who, when they first met, were complete strangers from halfway around the world.

This inaugural meeting is a milestone in the Geneva Learning Foundation’s project development to establish the first Impact Accelerator, a radically new approach to achieve impact better and faster, together.

The role of education in transforming for impact: A contribution to the OECD Forum 2019

By Reda Sadki (The Geneva Learning Foundation)

The assumption that countries have the capacity to take on recommendations from the best available knowledge, achieve understanding, and turn them into effective policy and action, leaves unanswered the mechanisms through which a publication, a series of meetings, or a policy comparison may lead to change. 

Technology has already transformed the ability of international organizations to move from knowledge production and diplomacy to new forms of scalable, networked action needed to tackle complex global challenges. This has created a significant opportunity for leaders to deliver on their mission.

‘Skills’ are necessary but insufficient

Some organizations are already offering high-quality, multi-lingual learning. Many are using digital technologies to scale, often at the cost of quality, helping large numbers of learners develop competencies. Conventional courses seldom produce change, even if they become digital and scalable. On their own, these are no longer innovative – much less transformative – goals. Several international organizations have built corporate universities and other types of learning functions that remain confined to the margins of the business and under threat from the next restructuring. None of these initiatives have moved the needle of impact.

Transforming for impact

At the Geneva Learning Foundation, we have developed a low-cost, scalable package of interventions for international organizations to leverage digital transformation to: (1) bridge the gap between thinking and doing at country level; and (2) foster the emergence of country leadership for positive change.

In our first three years, we have worked with partners across several thematic areas, developing this package to translate global guidelines into effective local action, to support capability development from competency to implementation, and to perform multi-country peer review at scale.

  • Over 1,500 professionals in 90 countries have already participated in pilots.
  • 96% of graduates are applying what they gained from the best available global knowledge to implement projects and lead change.

A new economy of effort to produce change

This package can complement or replace existing low-volume, high-cost face-to-face workshops and conferences that are difficult to scale and measure.

  • It is entirely digital (motivating participants without offering travel, hotel, or per diem) and participants do not need to stop work to participate, significantly reducing both expenditure and opportunity cost, while improving efficacy.
  • It has fostered the emergence of informal, self-led and motivated groupings of professionals operating across agencies that may provide a different kind of lever for systemic change than traditional top-down approaches to addressing challenges and can replaced failed, conventional training-of-trainer and “cascade” models.

Recognizing the value of such emergent dynamics creates authentic opportunities to accelerate the transformation for impact.

Fostering such emergence is the hard part.

Sustainable transformation for impact

Last but not least, our business modelling demonstrates that, if the organization has healthy relationships with its stakeholders, financial sustainability (cost recovery) can be achieved within three years, so this is not one more mechanism dependent on donor good will.

As we have seen existing partnerships leads to promising results – above and beyond our own expectations – we are slowly growing in confidence about the strengths and sustainability of what began as a series of small-scale pilot projects and experiments.

Along the way, we have also learned how difficult it is to find the right mix of ingredients to move from ideas to successful execution to develop such a programme if it is to contribute to systemic change.

We will be at the OECD Forum on 20-21 May 2019 to share these promising results with organisations and governments that see the need for new, better ways of achieving change in policy and practice.

About the author

Reda Sadki (blog | Twitter) is the founder and president of the Geneva Learning Foundation, the Swiss non-profit organization with the mission to connect learning leaders to research, invent, and trial breakthrough approaches for new learning, talent and leadership as a way of shaping humanity and society for the better.

In the past, Reda Sadki worked for the United Nations, primarily for the World Health Organization, and at the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (IFRC).